Archive for the Saints News Category

Ken Sawyer Speaks on “Ad Tech in 5 Years” Panel at RampUp 2013

RampUp 2013: Ad Tech in 5 Years Hundreds of marketers and ad tech leaders came together to discuss the convergence of offline and online data. A few key points from the panel: Sawyer expressed an overall optimism, calling ad tech “this generation’s ERP [Enterprise Resource Planning].” However he wondered whether ad tech will evolve like the ERP system did “with the consolidation among Oracle, SAP, and a few other folks.” Kawaja replied that despite the signs of “a high growth sector,” and an overall great environment for consolidations similar to ERPs in the 80s, we are still seeing a high degree of fragmentation in ad tech. Why isn’t the consolidation happening faster? Milonopoulos answered that it is to the agency’s advantage to have multiple players, “to not have all your eggs in one basket with one provider.” Secondly, consolidators know that they are not going to be the first because

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Saints Capital MD Ghia Griarte Rounds Out Blockbuster IOS 2012 Panel

Saints Capital managing director Ghia Griarte rounds out the blockbuster Analyst Panel at IOS 2012. The theme for the panel, “Niches within Niches: Is …blog.internationaloutsourcingsummit.com/…/saints-capital-md-…

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Saints Capital and Bliss Capital Bring Direct Secondary Investment to the Middle East

Saints Capital and Bliss Capital Bring Direct Secondary Investment to the Middle East Sep 12, 2012 Saints Capital, one of the world’s leading direct secondary investment firms, has partnered with Bliss Capital, a newly formed MENA based investment manager, which will provide direct secondary investment management in the region. Bliss Capital focuses on managing portfolios of assets directly held by private equity investors, family offices, banks and corporations. Bliss’s target transactions size range between US$ 50 million and US$ 300 million across various industry sectors. Headquartered in San Francisco and founded in 2000, Saints is one of the most experienced and largest direct secondary investor in the United States. Saints has completed over 100 transactions with investments in over 200 portfolio companies across a diverse range of industries. Saints and Bliss launch their strategic partnership, combining Saints’ pool of capital, network of co-investors, and experience in structuring and executing complex

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Bryan Garnier Principal Investments and Saints Capital Launch a Strategic Partnership Focused on Offering Liquidity Solutions in France to Corporate, Institutional and Independent Private-Equity Asset Managers

Bryan Garnier Saints Capital In December 2011, Bryan Garnier Principal Investments and Saints Capital, a leading US secondary-direct investor, launched a partnership (BGSC) to offer liquidity solutions to the French private equity market. Target transactions focus between €50 million and €500 million across all asset types and stages.

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Within the Industry, an Urge to Cash Out

Within the Industry, an Urge to Cash Out Monday, 20 Jun 2011 | 10:30 AM ET The New York Times While Silicon Valley and Wall Street debate whether a new technology bubble is in the making, some early Facebook employees are not taking any chances. They’re leaving the company to cash out on millions of dollars in stock options while Facebook’s valuation continues to soar. “If you’ve seen the world blow up once, you just don’t know what’s going to happen a year from now,” said one former Facebook employee, referring to the dot-com crash a decade ago. He joined the company in its early days, and left a few months ago so he could sell some of his shares. A company policy bars current employees from selling stock. “It seemed very risky to stay in a situation where all of your liquidity was tied up in what I consider

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Martin Day interviewed by Ken Sawyer at SuperReturn U.S. 2011

Martin Day of OMERS Private Equity was interviewed by Kenneth Sawyer of Saints about OMERS direct investment strategy. He discussed access to deals, staff retention and compensation as well as OMERS future plans towards venture capital.

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Hot demand for private internet companies’ stock

Hot Demand for Private Internet Companies’ Stock August 24, 2010 7:55 pm By David Gelles On August 5, an unnamed investor made what many may consider a good bet – he bought a small stake in Facebook, the fast-growing social networking site. However, as a private company, Facebook has not disclosed details of its financial performance and the $76-a-share the investor paid has raised eyebrows from Wall Street to Silicon Valley. The trade gave Facebook an implied valuation of $33.7bn, making it worth more than most companies on Nasdaq. The spike in prices is driven by a big mismatch in supply and demand, prompted by the decision by some of the better-known private tech companies, such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Zynga, to delay going public while the market for IPOs remains shaky. The appetite for shares in private online ventures exists because a new breed of investors has created

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Building a Second Market to Make Way for Wall Street 3.0

Building a Second Market to Make Way for Wall Street 3.0 By Kathryn Glass Published July 16, 2010 | FOXBusiness At the height of the credit crisis, as formerly liquid markets seized up and assets that were considered to be as liquid as cash froze almost overnight, SecondMarket saw possibility. Now, five years since its inception, this illiquid-asset broker is taking off, making a name for itself by facilitating the sale of stock in private companies like Facebook and LinkedIn, and doubling its market participants every six months. “At the end of 2008 we had about 2,500 buyers and sellers. At the end of 2009, we had about 6,500. We just hit 14,000 and we’re only halfway through 2010,” said SecondMarket’s founder and chief executive officer, Barry Silbert. Simply, SecondMarket is an online illiquid-asset marketplace; it’s what you might get when you cross a traditional broker-dealer with an eBay-like (EBAY)

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End Game: PE, VC Firms Seek Overtime On Funds

End Game: PE, VC Firms Seek Overtime On Funds Laura Kreutzer and Russell Garland July 01, 2010 Both buyout and venture firms are facing ticking time bombs embedded in their fund documents – albeit ones with different clocks. Buyout firms are coming up against the end of their investment periods for the funds raised from 2005 to 2007. These funds typically have four-to-six year investment periods, and the economic downturn in late 2008 means that many of them haven’t been able to put all the capital raised during the boom period to work. Venture firms, meanwhile, are facing end-of-fund-life deadlines for vehicles raised during their own earlier boom-and-bust cycle in the late 1990s. Funds typically have deadlines of 10 years to dispose of all their companies and wind down, but many VC funds from the late 1990s still have a substantial number of companies within their portfolios. The typical path

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After VC Storm, who will be left?

After VC storm, who will be left? Feb 21, 2010 @ 12:01 am By Arleen Jacobius Venture capital today is survival of the pluckiest. About three-quarters of the estimated 1,500 VC firms now in business worldwide aren’t expected to be around after they finish investing their current portfolios. And those leaving the VC arena aren’t only the lesser-known firms. Just last month, executives at Silicon Valley stalwart Draper Fisher Jurvetson Portage Venture Partners acknowledged that the firm will close after the existing portfolio is invested. Still, there are survivors, and even new entrants. Some VC firms managed to close funds in 2009 — a year that had the fewest number of funds raised since 1993 and the lowest amount of capital since 2003 — while others were able to exit existing investments and make new ones. VC stalwarts Greylock Partners, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Sequoia Capital and VantagePoint Venture

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